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Cute Stuff

Have you seen the really cute stuff over at Adorn Magazine on their web exclusives page? If you haven’t, skip on over there and take a look. There’s a couple of crochet patterns in the mix as well as a couple of knitted ones.

I really like the magazine, but admittedly, I haven’t always looked for it in the store. The only places I’ve ever been able to find it is Barnes & Noble and Joann’s, and last time I was at either place, I didn’t notice it on the magazine shelves. I think I’m going to search out the newest issue next time I’m out and about though. It seems to be geared towards that set of crafters that are younger than I am, but it still has a lot of great ideas.

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Is Crochet Cheap?

It’s been said in a couple of places on the net that some people think crocheters are cheap (I don’t have the quotes offhand to elaborate), which is one reason why crochet gets such a bad rep.

In making a list of some yarns I’m going to order this weekend, I’ve noticed that the most expensive yarn I need for one of the projects I’m wanting to start is $4.99 a skein, making the overall cost of the project twenty bucks, not figuring in time. The least expensive is $1.99 x 2 and the middle one is $3.95 x 3. When I figure my total cost including tax and shipping & handling, my total comes to fifty-five dollars and some change. I have to wonder if this is actually considered cheap. I know I’m getting three projects from the yarn–a pair of socks, a plus-sized tank, and a baby gift–but still yarn is yarn, and I’m buying what I actually need for each of my projects. If I needed a more expensive and different yarn content, I’d purchase it, but since I don’t, the less expensive yarns are the pratical solution.

Funny. I don’t feel cheap at all. Giving of my time and putting a little love into every stitch of every project no matter who it is for or what yarn content it is made of is really the only way to truly judge what an item costs overall. You just can’t put a price tag on that.

Monogomy

Booking Through Thursday badge

One book at a time? Or more than one? If more, are they different types/genres? Or similar?

Usually more than one at a time but rarely more than two. And almost always different genres, although they may be similiar in tone.

Magazine-versary

It’s Crochet Today!’s one year anniversary and to celebrate, they’re offering a free crochet cake pattern. You can get it here: Crochet Confection, but just be sure you have a program that reads PDFs since that’s the kind of file it is. It’s cute, but I’m not big on crocheting food items. I saved it to my crochet folder just in case, though.

So far, I’ve not missed one issue of this magazine. Not all issues were totally awesome, but I’ve really not been disappointed with any of them thus far. I don’t like receiving my subscription issue days–sometimes weeks–after the same issue hits the newsstand, however. My renewal is coming up, which leads me to debating whether or not to keep getting them in the mail late or hope that they get their mail service to deliver in a more timely manner. Thinking about it, I know I’ll probably renew. At least that way, I know I won’t miss an issue, even though I may get them late. This last issue was fairly timely, so maybe it’s something they’re working on.

Slow to WIP

My WIPs are slow moving lately. I haven’t picked up my hook since right before I left for Texas, and all of my works are still in progress. I’m still working on my two crib blankets, my butterfly shawl, and my daughter’s spirit blanket. I’ve yet to make a single stitch in the felted slippers, and now there’s two other projects I want to start. Once is crocheted socks for a CAL in Ravelry, and the other is a pair of high top baby booties for the new baby boy in our family (found in Crochet Today, Sept/Oct issue). I’m going to try to get the yarn for both in the next couple of weeks and see what I can do. In the meantime, I’m still going to work on my other projects and hopefully make a dent in them.

In other news, I picked up two more books while I was in Texas. One is Treasury of Crochet Techniques and Patterns, published in 1984. It has a decent technique library but the patterns themselves are mostly things that I’d never make. The other book is Vintage to Vogue: The Best of Workbasket. It has some really nice patterns in it for both knit and crochet, rewritten to suit today’s styles. I have some of the old copies of Workbasket that I got at an estate sale, so I thought this would be a good addition to my pattern books.

Now I just need to get that hook moving again since I have so many more patterns than I seem to have time!

Back in the Day

Back In The Day: 101 Things Everyone Used To Know How To Do  – I picked up this lil’ book at Barnes & Noble yesterday because of its content. Inside is 101 different things that people used to know how to do–things like Operate a Telegraph Machine, Behave at a Medieval Banquet, Cure People With Leeches & Maggots, and Defend a Castle. We all need to know how to do those things, right? Maybe not in the modern world as we know it, but there really was a time all of these were needed.

The book also touches on a few crafts. There’s instructions for making a corn husk doll, how to make a Roman mosaic, blowing glass, weaving a basket, and making soap. There’s also instructions for shearing a sheep, and several pages before it tells how to tease, card, and spin wool. Yep. One of my personal favorites is How to Make Bread, since I’ve been trying to perfect that whole wheat loaf for some time now.

There’s also games. Ever wanted to know how to play hopscotch? It’s in there. How to play Jacks or Tennis? Both are in there. How about how to use a Hula Hoop? Yes, you can find the instructions in this neat guide. It tells what directions to move your hips and how, but it doesn’t say what to do if your hips just do not move the way they should in order to get that ring going.

It talks about growing your own herbs, keeping bees, and making your own honey. You can also learn to brew mead. Ever wanted to be a nurse on the battlefield? Well, thanks to this book, you can learn to set a broken bone and treat a battle wound. If you’re not a poet but want to be, you can learn the steps to writing a sonnet. A world of information in such a small place–the list goes on.

There’s also a few items I hope I never have to know how to do–like embalm a body or tie a hangman’s noose–but I’m glad I have this handy little reference nearby, just in case.